About

About

About the Holocaust

The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators. Holocaust is a word of Greek origin meaning “sacrifice by fire.” The Nazis, who came to power in Germany in January 1933, believed that Germans were “racially superior” and that the Jews, deemed “inferior,” were an alien threat to the so-called German racial community.

During the era of the Holocaust, German authorities also targeted other groups because of their perceived “racial inferiority”: Roma (Gypsies), the disabled, and some of the Slavic peoples (Poles, Russians, and others). Other groups were persecuted on political, ideological, and behavioral grounds, among them Communists, Socialists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and homosexuals. (Source: ushmm.org)

About the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh

The Holocaust was a unique historical event; the lessons we learn from it are universal. We are committed to educating about the Holocaust, commemorating those who suffered and triumphed, and documenting the stories of survivors, liberators and protectors.

Established in 1981, the Holocaust Center was created as a living memorial to honor survivors who came to Pittsburgh to rebuild their lives and local soldiers who helped liberate the camps. Rather than build a statue or monument, community members wanted a comprehensive resource center that would help people learn about the Holocaust and counter intolerance and hate in all its forms.

The Holocaust Center was established through the generous gift of Leonard Rudolph, who believed in the power of giving to transform people’s lives. His legacy continues to inspire the community to work together to build a better world.

What we do

Currently we are located at 826 Hazelwood Ave in the Greenfield neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Our offerings include a permanent and rotating art gallery, an archive of over 3,000 books, a variety of educational programs, and events and opportunities to connect the Holocaust to today. Almost all of our resources are intended to be shared with all members of the community, regardless of religious heritage or personal connection with historical events. We also offer select programs exclusively for survivors and their families.